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Swedish keyboard?

I live in Sweden and use a Swedish keyboard.  I use a Debian-based distro with Enlightenment 17, called Elive.  During installation there was no option to choose keyboard layout, and now I am stuck with the default, a US keymap.  I need to change this to a Swedish keymap.  I turned to the Elive fora first with this question, and I might even get an answer eventually -- in a year or so.  The activity in their fora is negligible.  That is why I ask you to help me.  The solution is probably just to put in the right command in the terminal, but I don't know the right command.  I would really appreciate if you could help me out.  Thank you.

Ean.

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If your edit your .xinitrc file in /home/user and put on a new line "setxkbmap sv" - does it work?

- ARCH LINUX -

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Thank you, dikatlon.  I'll try that.  I would really like the Swedish keymap to be global however.  That is, I want it to be the default keymap for every user -- including root.  It's unnecessarily difficult to write commands in the terminal when I can't find the key for / etc.  In Debian, the appropriate keymap is set during installation, and it is global (the same for all users).  Since Elive is just Debian with an Enlightenment front end, the way this is accomplished in Debian ought to work just as well for Elive.
Anyway, thanks again.  

Ean.

 

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Okey, you could always try "dpkg-reconfigure keyboard-configuration". It should show you a guide to choose console keyboard layout. After selecting and saving use command "setupcon" to apply it. Now how's that?

- ARCH LINUX -

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Did it work? Smile

- ARCH LINUX -

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Hi dikatlon.  Thank you for your help, but unfortunately it didn't work. I got an error message saying that this or that was not installed.  Elive is so buggy, and there is so much about it that doesn't work, that I have given up on it.

I read about ExLight in this forum, and decided to try that instead.  That doesn't go too well either, though.  I can't even install it, since it insists that I have no internet access (!).

I am reluctant to install it from the DVD without internet access, and then try to configure internet access when the system is installed, since the installer wishes to download stuff during installation.

I have installed a couple of different Linux distros recently, and they have configured internet access automatically, so I am at a loss as to why ExLight fails to do so (or what to do about it).

I am not looking for anything fancy.  All I want is the Enlightenment environment and simple internet tools: Firefox, Thunderbird etc.  Although it is not a requirement, I would prefer if the system were Debian -- but I can live with Ubuntu.  This is why ExLight seemed very interesting.  Too bad.

At the moment I feel a bit frustrated, but eventually I guess I'll try to search for some other distro that looks interesting.  After all, I have a computer dedicated just for Linux and my dissatisfaction with Windoze grows with every day.

Again thank you for your help.  Sorry I didn't reply to your latest post until now, but I haven't used the 'net for a couple of days.

Ean

 

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I can understand your frustration over this. One distro that is worth mention in your case might be Archlinux. It has a KISS-mentality behind its approach. But debian should be sufficient for you if you don't bother not having the latest software. If you don't have a problem working with the console both Archlinux and debian could be a good start for you.

- ARCH LINUX -

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ExLight seems very interesting, and I would very much like to try it.  However, as I explained, the ExLight installer refuses to acknowledge that my computer is connected to the internet.  Perhaps it is possible to configure the internet connection after installation, but that might prove to be very messy, and I am worried that the installation (if I perform it without internet access) might not be complete, since the installer expects to download and install stuff during the installation process.  If the installer is convinced that it is not connected to the internet, it will not download and install these (perhaps very important) things during the installation process.  If somebody knows a way around this, I would be grateful to hear it.

I like Debian.  As long as you use the default installation, it's stable.  However, I don't like Gnome.  I would prefer to use Enlightenment.  E17 is not in Debian's list of available downloads, but E16 is, and I would settle for that if it were possible.  Unfortunately, if you download and install E16 in Debian, you will find that it is broken.  It automatically imports all installed applications, from Gnome and elsewhere, and makes them available in the middle and right button menus, which is good.  Less good is that it can't be configured.  The default theme is butt ugly, and there is no way to change themes.  Downloading a bunch of E16 themes and placing them in usr/local/share/desktop/enlightenment/themes (I don't have the manual in front of me right now, but it was something like that) or in your home/desktop/.enlightenment/themes directory accomplishes absolutely nothing.  There might be a way to change the themes, but that would probably take weeks (or months) of writing to forums for help and trying several different changes to several different config files, creating new directories and new config files, changing access modes and writing (and changing) paths in these files, and by the time it's finally possible to change themes, I'll probably have messed up all of E16 (as well as the system) completely beyond recovery anyway, by unwittingly changing some vital commands in E16's configuration files.  I've had to re-install the whole system countless times after trying to get WMs like Afterstep and Enlightenment to work, starting way back in Mandrake.  And I have RTFM Smile.  

After these failures I have tended to stay away from Linux for years, but I have always wanted to make a permanent migration to Linux eventually.  I figure that the less I have to install on top of the default system (or worse -- exchange for a default part of the system, like switching from the default WM to another) the less risk there is that something will go wrong (I hope).  This is why I I would like a distro that already has Enlightenment installed.

If I can't have Enlightenment, I might go with plain Debian.  Gnome is awful, but at least I like the rest of Debian.

I've tried several Linuxes, but not Archlinux.  What do you mean by "a KISS-mentality"?  Not like the rock band I guess?

I don't have any problem working with the console -- I like it.  What I don't like is digging through endless layers of directories in order to find some specific file in which I have to change whatever obscure command is written on a specific line into some other obscure command followed by an even more obscure path, and then do the same to umpteen other files in as many other directories scattered all over, just in order to, for instance, add an application to a menu, or to be able to connect to the internet (this is especially annoying if, even after you've made all those changes in all those files, what you've wanted to achieve still doesn't work).  

I use to tell people who don't know anything about Linux, and are afraid to try it, to download Ubuntu.  "It's simpler to use than Windoze," I tell them, "and it works right out of the box.  There are no arcane configurations you have to perform.  Just install it and go!"

I might follow my own advice if it weren't for one thing.  I want Enlightenment.

Thank you for your help.

Ean

 

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Maybe you could try Bodhi Linux, the Enlightened Linux Distribution.

Ingemar